Does the use of CBD oil have side effects? CBD is a natural substance, a cannabinoid from the cannabis/hemp plant, whose positive properties on the human organism are not only attributed by scientists and physicians but by people all over the world who have experienced its healing and therapeutic abilities. Even though it is a natural substance and because of the fact that we have our own cannabinoid system (endocannabinoid system), it looks as if it has been created for us, nevertheless the question arises whether CBD has side effects. And if so, which one? Under which circumstances? And at what dose?
Start with a small dose and work your way up. If you aren’t sure how much CBD oil to consume, start with just a few milligrams per dose and work your way up to a gram or more if you need to. CBD oil works best in small amounts and can have a reverse effect if too much is consumed, so it’s best to start off with a very small amount, experiment with a little more if necessary, and make adjustments until you’ve figure out what works best for you.[5]
I’m on my second bottle of CBD Oil. I have back problems – wear and tear on my lumber spine – and I have a very stressful job, so I thought I would give it a try. I’m not sure if I am getting any benefit from it? I still have the lower back pain every day. I get a real strain in my lower back even if I have been standing too long (5 mins) I take Cocodamol 30/500 8 per day but I’ve tried tramadol, diazepam, everything, but nothing seems to help especially if I put my back out and I’m doubled over!
Featuring the same benefits as our pure RSHO™ hemp oil in a reduced potency, another of our midrange products, RSHO™ liquid, contains 31 mg of CBD per serving. Available in Green, Blue, and Gold Label oils, RSHO™ liquid combines our flagship RSHO™ with medium chain triglyceride (MCT) oil derived from wholesome coconut oil and sustainably sourced palm oil. Unlike RSHO™ pure hemp oils, RSHO™ liquid doesn’t need to be refrigerated, making it convenient to store wherever you need it most.
The price of the product does not reflect it’s quality. Unfortunately, in the world of supplements, there are many unscrupulous companies. Just because it’s priced in the upper tier does not mean it’s upper tier quality. Look for companies that have third party testing and good comments and reviews. After much wasted money, I have learned that lesson. I hate hearing that herbal remedies are useless from people who’ve tried them, but don’t realize it’s the company that put in useless ingredients. Also, to the posters who report itchy mouth or other itchy side effects, my daughter is allergic to soy, even in trace amounts, her tongue, throat and the roof of her mouth start itching immediately and then her skin starts itching a few minutes later. I’m thinking that perhaps you are reacting to a soy oil carrier, or ingredient in the CBD, and not to the CBD itself. Perhaps a change to an olive oil carrier, or another type of product without soy, or lecithin.
The amount of milligrams of CBD you should take depends on your specific reason for taking CBD. If you are using CBD to treat chronic pain, you might take a much higher dose than someone who would be using CBD for general wellness reasons. Google search for your specific condition or reason for taking CBD to find the dose that is appropriate for you. You can take CBD in high qualities, so feel free to test out different dosages and see how your body reacts. A standard dose of CBD is 10 mg once a day, but this varies so widely because each individual is different so this can’t be taken as a recommendation for you.
Transparency: cbdMD seems to be going through a transition with their third-party testing practices. Until recently, they only released a lab report for the CBD concentrate they use for all their products, but would not show potency testing for individual products. That seems to be changing. Currently, the only lab report on the website is for their concentrate (and it’s over a year old). But if you contact customer service, they’ll send you a lab report for any product. 

Collin, C., Ehler, E., Waberzinek, G., Alsindi, Z., Davies, P., Powell, K., Notcutt, W., O'Leary, C., Ratcliffe, S., Novakova, I., Zapletalova, O., Pikova, J., and Ambler, Z. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of Sativex, in subjects with symptoms of spasticity due to multiple sclerosis. Neurol.Res. 2010;32(5):451-459. View abstract.


The main thing to consider when figuring out how to find the right strength CBD oil is to realize that everyone’s internal biochemistry is different – while your friend may be able to relieve her anxiety with just a single 3 mg dose, you may require several times that much in order to obtain the same results. Or, you may not find any relief at all. This is why it’s important to start off with the smallest possible dose, and work up from there.
CBD may be best known for its relaxing, calming effects. CBD reduces autonomic arousal, having the inverse effect of THC on the body. CBD’s anti-anxiety effect is why many in the cannabis community talk about how CBD relieves paranoia, although that is not scientifically proven yet. CBD is also known for its anti-nausea and pain relieving effects. It really depends on why your body’s specific needs and the quantity in which you take CBD.

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The passage of the 2018 Farm Bill made it legal to sell hemp and hemp products in the U.S. But that doesn't mean that all hemp-derived cannabidiol products are legal. Since cannabidiol has been studied as a new drug, it can't be legally included in foods or dietary supplements. Also, cannabidiol can't be included in products marketed with therapeutic claims. Cannabidiol can only be included in "cosmetic" products and only if it contains less than 0.3% THC. But there are still products labeled as dietary supplements on the market that contain cannabidiol. The amount of cannabidiol contained in these products is not always reported accurately on the product label.
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