This article provides a wealth of practical information for the individual considering CBD as an adjunctive or alternative treatment for pain and or anxiety. CBD works in the body by manipulating receptors throughout organ tissues, the immune system, the pain response system, the hormonal system, and other systemic regulatory systems. While CBD oils have not been reviewed or approved by the FDA for the treatment of these conditions, a wealth of literature, both anecdotal and research-related now exists to help describe both their safety and effectiveness. As discussed in this article, the potential new adopter must be mindful of several important items. First, only those products that are sourced from Industrial Hemp will be considered legal in all states. One must be careful if the product you choose is sourced from the marijuana plant, as those products may contain THC levels above the legal limit in your given state. Secondly, all products are NOT created equal – they differ significantly in strength, absorption, and elimination by the body and in the manner in which they are formulated. One should be mindful of the differences in doses available for each of these products, starting at a low or moderate dose and increasing as needed in order to find the lowest dose that provides the desired relief. In this way, one can individualize usage to maximize effectiveness, while minimizing risk, a proper goal for the use of all medicinals.

Consume CBD oil via edibles to enjoy a sweet treat. There are many edible products available for purchase that contain CBD oil as an ingredient. These are often in the form of gummies or other candies, but also come as an edible liquid that you can mix into foods, such as smoothies. If you live in a state where it’s legal, go online and choose whichever edibles sound good to you. After purchasing, make sure to read the instructions and take them as directed.[2]


But scientists have found that CBD doesn’t bind well with endocannabinoid receptors. Instead, CBD influences the system indirectly. This creates many benefits, which is why you’ll hear of CBD as a treatment for so many different medical conditions. And, unlike THC, it won’t make you high. When it comes to pain, we know that CBD has multiple functions. First, it influences neurotransmitters and receptors. One receptor known to be involved with pain and inflammation is called TRPV1 — also known as a vanilloid receptor. CBD binds to the TRPV1 receptor, influencing the way you perceive pain. CBD can also affect the production of neurotransmitters like serotonin and glutamate, which are related to pain sensation.
I’m on my second bottle of CBD Oil. I have back problems – wear and tear on my lumber spine – and I have a very stressful job, so I thought I would give it a try. I’m not sure if I am getting any benefit from it? I still have the lower back pain every day. I get a real strain in my lower back even if I have been standing too long (5 mins) I take Cocodamol 30/500 8 per day but I’ve tried tramadol, diazepam, everything, but nothing seems to help especially if I put my back out and I’m doubled over!
Hi, I just started using CBD Oil (NULeaf) concentration 50mg/ml. I only took 10 drops sublingually (below tongue for 60 seconds) as suggested the first time round and had the same experience. I felt great within 30mins afterward, my shingles pains and joint pains/skin pain subsided almost 90% and brain fog (probably from sinus problems) lifted like a veil. I was so happy. Next morning I took 4 more drops as I had a slight headache (like a dehydration headache) by the afternoon I had a horrible migraine (which I haven’t had in 6months) and vomiting throughout the night. I stopped the CBD but for the next 2 days I still had headaches in the back of my head (like dehydration headaches). Now I feel very uneasy taking the oil again. I really want this to work, as the shingles related nerve pain is driving be crazy and my anxiety levels anyways are thru the roof. I am wondering if you’ve found a solution and are still taking the CBD. I will start again today with a 3 drop dose once a day and see if I can come up with a dosage that doesn’t cause me headaches and still do the job I intended it for.
There’s a growing consensus that cannabis is a highly effective treatment for many kinds of neuropathic pain. A 2015 study published in Neurotherapeutics states, “Clinical studies largely affirm that neuropathic pain patients derive benefits from cannabinoid treatment.”   But much of the human-based research (like this study) on CBD and nerve pain has centered around the efficacy of the FDA-approved medication Sativex, which includes both THC and CBD. Research on the best CBD for pain isolated from THC is still limited when it comes to neuropathic pain. There are exceptions, though:
Please read: I am receiving 50+ emails daily asking the same question so I need to put this here. So for all of you that are asking for “the best” brand recommendation: there is no “the BEST” brand and different brands work best for different conditions and issues. However I am always recommending choosing verified production since it’s your high quality and safety guarantee. The one brand I can vouch for is Verified CBD – https://verifiedcbd.com

The amount of milligrams of CBD you should take depends on your specific reason for taking CBD. If you are using CBD to treat chronic pain, you might take a much higher dose than someone who would be using CBD for general wellness reasons. Google search for your specific condition or reason for taking CBD to find the dose that is appropriate for you. You can take CBD in high qualities, so feel free to test out different dosages and see how your body reacts. A standard dose of CBD is 10 mg once a day, but this varies so widely because each individual is different so this can’t be taken as a recommendation for you.
A newcomer to our CBD oils ranking, RE: Botanicals is no stranger to hemp. Founded by John Roulac, a long-time hemp advocate and founder of the organic superfoods brand Nutiva, RE: Botanicals is one of the only CBD brands to earn the USDA organic seal. They deserve a shout-out for prioritizing regenerative agriculture, while keeping prices reasonable.   
Other potential side effects include low blood pressure, lightheadedness, and drowsiness, but these have typically only occurred in patients who have exceeded doses of 1,500 mg daily for a period of 4 weeks or more; far more than the average person will need take on a daily basis for chronic pain symptoms. (In fact, the majority of CBD users claim they find an effective dose to be anywhere between 10 and 40 mg daily).
And lastly, don’t hesitate to speak with a marijuana doctor or health professional about using CBD oil. And please note,  it is not our goal for any of the information on here to come across as clinical advice or medical recommendations. If you live in a state with legalized medical marijuana, make sure you take full advantage of the resources that are available to you – getting a licensed MMJ card is easier than it has ever been before, and it could very well be one of the best decisions you’ve ever made for yourself.

Vape Pens – Perhaps the easiest way to get the CBD Oil into your body is through a vape pen. A vape pen is about the size of an ink pen but has a CBD oil cartridge with a heating element. Many people like vape pens because there is very little in the way of odor after using it and it allows for a lot of discretion because it can be pulled out of your pocket and used on demand.
CBD derived from marijuana is a different story, and the law varies from state to state. But as long as you’re using CBD oil that contains less than 0.3 percent THC, you have nothing to be concerned about anywhere in the United States. On the other hand, if you want to take your CBD on a trip outside the country, definitely look into local laws to avoid getting into awkward situations while you’re away.
A natural plant extract, CBD (or cannabidiol) has made a huge stir in the health scene over the last decade. It’s not hard to find plentiful anecdotal evidence of its benefits — people are using CBD for pain relief, mood regulation, cancer prevention, even seizure reduction. But if you’re in pain, you’re probably looking for more than anecdotal evidence. We get it — and we’re here to help.
In your internet travels, you may also come across products called “terpsolates.” The manufacturers of these products infuse CBD Isolate with terpenes (but not cannabinoids like THC). These terpenes may enhance the effectiveness of CBD — or maybe they just make it smell good. This may be a good place to point out that not all CBD products are created equal. The industry is still largely unregulated, and the quality and quantity of CBD in a given product will vary wildly. Third-party testing definitely helps to monitor companies’ claims, but it’s still up to you as the consumer to do your homework on the best CBD products.

The studies on CBD for headache pain are still in their infancy, but with promising results so far. A 2017 study published in the Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research Journal worked with 26 people who were experiencing rebound headaches. The pain management results were better for the cannabis-nabilone formula over either ibuprofen or nabilone alone. (As a nerdy side note, the article is a great read if you’re interested in the history of cannabis as a pain reliever.)
Pioneers of the CBD industry, 4 Corners Cannabis helped pave the way for companies that want to provide quality products and utilize best practices. They grow their own strain of hemp and make small batches of true full-spectrum CBD products. Their prices place them lower down on our ranking, but their highly satisfied customers are more than willing to pay for the 4 Corners quality.  
After months of visiting doctors and sitting through tests like a human lab rat, it was determined that there was a slight anomaly in the anatomy of my temporal lobe—the part of the brain that controls hearing, speech, and auditory comprehension—which explains why every time I have a seizure, I suddenly don’t understand the English language. Epilepsy can’t be cured, so the only course of action available for me was to take a medication every day for the rest of my life. My neurologist prescribed a few different anti-convulsant medications, but they all made me feel tired, depressed, slow, and unlike myself—until finally, I found one that was slightly better than the rest.
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