Moreover, a patient survey conducted by Project CBD, declared that “…cannabis appears to be an effective pain management tool with few negative side effects.” The study went on to say that a “…significant decrease in opiate usage among elderly patients while taking medical cannabis [was observed during trial].” In short, it has been portrayed clearly numerous times through valid and well-publicized clinical studies that cannabis is a practical option in terms of efficient pain management.
And lastly, don’t hesitate to speak with a marijuana doctor or health professional about using CBD oil. And please note,  it is not our goal for any of the information on here to come across as clinical advice or medical recommendations. If you live in a state with legalized medical marijuana, make sure you take full advantage of the resources that are available to you – getting a licensed MMJ card is easier than it has ever been before, and it could very well be one of the best decisions you’ve ever made for yourself.

I use this for my anxiety and for my arthritis. The topical works great for my chronic neck pain. The best way to go is to get your own raw, tested material and use it in whatever form you like. It’s quite easy to make your own extract. This has worked better for me, rather than relying on a purchased, untested product – where some seem to work and others are a waste. But even with those that work, of course the cost is ridiculous and not affordable, thanks to all these corporate-pleasing laws in place, not there for the people – don’t delude yourselves.
Cannabis has always been a popular form of treatment for a variety of medical conditions, but in the 1930’s growing concerns about the dangers of marijuana abuse led to cannabinoids being banned. A century has past and despite all efforts from cannabis enthusiasts through social media channels and online media, cannabis is still classed as a schedule 1 drug.
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