CO2 extraction is one of the most common ways CBD is extracted from the hemp or cannabis plants. This method uses expensive equipment that adjusts temperature and pressure to extract the cannabinoids from the plant material, without damaging them. The other common method is to use solvents like ethanol or butane to extract the plant material. These solvents have to be burned off the final product which may damage the cannabinoids or terpenes in the process. There is also a risk that these solvents may not have burned off completely and could end up in your end product.
Pioneers of the CBD industry, 4 Corners Cannabis helped pave the way for companies that want to provide quality products and utilize best practices. They grow their own strain of hemp and make small batches of true full-spectrum CBD products. Their prices place them lower down on our ranking, but their highly satisfied customers are more than willing to pay for the 4 Corners quality.  
As mentioned above, CBDPure is a natural oil extracted through cold pressing and CO2 procedures from Cannabis sativa. Specialists have identified over 80 compounds known as cannabinoids. Their research so far showed that CBD is the predominant cannabinoid, accounting for over 40% of the cannabinoids concentration. It is also the most beneficial for human health, at least from the cannabinoids studied so far.

When administered alone, CBD is an effective anticonvulsant in maximal electrical shock (MES), magnesium-free, 4-aminopyridine, and audiogenic models (7, 8). Co-administration with AEDs leads to various effects; anticonvulsant effects of CBD are enhanced with phenytoin or phenobarbital but decreased with chlordiazepoxide, clonazepam, trimethadione, and ethosuximide. In a recent study using an acute pilocarpine model, although CBD administration reduced the number of animals displaying seizure activity, CBD did not appear to have any significant effect on the number of seizures per animal (7).


Moreover, a patient survey conducted by Project CBD, declared that “…cannabis appears to be an effective pain management tool with few negative side effects.” The study went on to say that a “…significant decrease in opiate usage among elderly patients while taking medical cannabis [was observed during trial].” In short, it has been portrayed clearly numerous times through valid and well-publicized clinical studies that cannabis is a practical option in terms of efficient pain management.
Please note that none of the presented products or services haven’t been evaluated by FDA as yet hence they are not intended to offer an alternative or substitute for a proper medical diagnose, a proper medical /surgical treatment or to prevent /cure certain illness conditions. For best results, you must contact your doctor after doing your own homework and why not, reading various feedbacks found easily all over the web. The info found on this page will not substitute a proper medical advice hence treat them as such, no matter you are considering a product that will help you lose weight, a success story or when quoting other publications or TV shows.

Cannabidiol is the major nonpsychoactive component of Cannabis sativa. Over the centuries, a number of medicinal preparations derived from C. sativa have been employed for a variety of disorders, including gout, rheumatism, malaria, pain, and fever. These preparations were widely employed as analgesics by Western medical practitioners in the 19th century (1). More recently, there is clinical evidence suggesting efficacy in HIV-associated neuropathic pain, as well as spasms associated with multiple sclerosis (1).


A number of difficulties exist in evaluating published data on CBD or marijuana use for epilepsy. The extremely limited published studies were small, poorly described, and not well designed. Contributing to the difficulty of interpreting published studies, CBD products are not produced under the guidance of good manufacturing practices (GMP) and are not subject to regulations governing labeling, purity, and reliability. In other words, currently, there is no guarantee of consistency between products, or even differing lots produced by the same manufacturer. Without independent testing (e.g. USP certification) of CBD products for content and purity, as well as bioavailability testing of specific products, uncertainty surrounds the use of available CBD products in routine clinical settings.
CBD is well tolerated in humans with doses up to 600 mg not resulting in psychotic symptoms (15). In the few small placebo-controlled studies performed, no significant CNS effects were noted. Oral CBD undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism via CYP3A4, with a bioavailability of 6%. Following single doses in humans, the half-life of CBD when taken orally is about 1 to 2 days.1 In vitro studies have shown that CBD is a potent inhibitor of multiple CYP isozymes, including CYP 2C and CYP3A (16, 17). Whether these in vitro observations are relevant at plasma concentrations likely to be seen in patients is unclear. In addition, given its metabolism via CYP3A4, clinical trials of CBD in patients receiving enzyme-inducing AEDs, such as carbamazepine or phenytoin, will require detailed pharmacokinetic studies.
There is a strong sedative quality to CBD hemp oil, making it a popular remedy for people with insomnia, sleeplessness, interrupted sleep, post-traumatic stress disorder, restless leg disorder, and other night-time issues. Dr. Scott Shannon, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, USA, published a report in the Permanete Journal, in which he recommended either inhaling a small amount of CBD oil, applying it to one’s chest, or even putting a few drops on one’s pillow to help get a good night’s sleep.

Like we said, once you start using CBD oil more frequently and are able to gauge how much you need to find relief or therapy, then you can jump up to the more high-potency products as needed. For reference, doses will typically range anywhere from 5 mg to 100+ mg in a single day. And for epilepsy patients, they may take anywhere between 300 mg to an entire gram (1,000 mg) per dose — or more!
Transparency: Moon Mother sends each batch of product to a third-party lab to be tested for potency as well as other contaminants. You can find all of these lab reports on the company’s website. They also added more information about their company processes to the website, so it’s easier to find important information about extraction and manufacturing.
Vape oil: CBD vape oil is used for vaping CBD. This requires the use of an e-cigarette or vape pen, which can have side effects when chemicals are heated to high temperatures. There are also CBD waxes available that are used for dabbing the cannabis compound. This also requires heating a small amount of the wax and using a dabbing pen. This isn’t recommended for beginners, as it’s usually a higher concentration of CBD.
Moreover, a patient survey conducted by Project CBD, declared that “…cannabis appears to be an effective pain management tool with few negative side effects.” The study went on to say that a “…significant decrease in opiate usage among elderly patients while taking medical cannabis [was observed during trial].” In short, it has been portrayed clearly numerous times through valid and well-publicized clinical studies that cannabis is a practical option in terms of efficient pain management.
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