Gloss and Vickrey conducted a Cochrane systematic review of the use of CBD in the treatment of epilepsy (11). Their methodology included only those trials that were randomized and controlled and excluded case series, case reports, and expert opinion. They were able to identify only 4 randomized controlled studies reported in the literature, and they included a letter to the editor and an abstract. The total number of subjects enrolled in these studies was 48 (11–14). While only four studies and a letter to the editor were in the actual analysis, the authors included a complete reference listing of all articles reviewed for inclusion.
Moreover, a patient survey conducted by Project CBD, declared that “…cannabis appears to be an effective pain management tool with few negative side effects.” The study went on to say that a “…significant decrease in opiate usage among elderly patients while taking medical cannabis [was observed during trial].” In short, it has been portrayed clearly numerous times through valid and well-publicized clinical studies that cannabis is a practical option in terms of efficient pain management.
Several weeks after a hysterectomy last spring, Bo Roth was suffering from exhaustion and pain that kept her on the couch much of the day. The 58-year-old Seattle speech coach didn’t want to take opioid pain-killers, but Tylenol wasn’t helping enough. Roth was intrigued when women in her online chat group enthused about a cannabis-derived oil called cannabidiol (CBD) that they said relieved pain without making them high. So Roth, who hadn’t smoked weed since college but lived in a state where cannabis was legal, walked into a dispensary and bought a CBD tincture.
CBD is a chemical found in marijuana. CBD doesn't contain tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive ingredient found in marijuana that produces a high. The usual CBD formulation is oil, but CBD is also sold as an extract, a vaporized liquid and an oil-based capsule. Food, drinks and beauty products are among the many CBD-infused products available online.
Although several clinical studies focused on the health effects of CBD, the results available so far were not enough to convince the FDA to approve it as a drug. The FDA does not agree with its use as a dietary supplement either, but as long as sellers publish the appropriate disclaimers (like those on the CBDPure website and labels), it’s not up to them.
Unlike other CBD oils, PureKana really does excel in CBD oil extractions due to their unique CO2 extraction process which provides a near 99% pure CBD oil. PureKana Natural CBD Oil is an unflavored, dietary and nutritional supplement for increased health and vitality. It is extremely effective in helping to treat chronic pain, support recovery from exercise-induced inflammation, swelling, management of normal, everyday stresses, and to help promote healthy sleep cycles.
The main thing that is inherently clear when scouting out FabCBD (which is a super new brand by the way that only just got started this year), is that they’ve made a pretty serious effort to develop a modern lifestyle brand. If you take a look at their website, everything from the web design to the brand labeling to the text they use screams modern and hip.
Tinctures – Typically tinctures are small glass or plastic “dropper” bottles that have cannabidiol oil mixed with a preserving solution such as alcohol. Tinctures were very a very common way to ingest botanical oils prior to the industrial revolution and are experiencing a resurgence in popularity as more people are looking for natural remedies. Tinctures with droppers allow you to put a few drops in your tea, under your tongue, or to bake the oil directly into your food.

The cannabis plant contains a unique group of carbon compounds often referred to a phytocannabinoids. The most common ingredient is THC, which creates the euphoric high effect. Due to the THC element in the plant, marijuana is often associated with a stoner stigma of people only wanting to get high. But that is far from the truth. Cannabis also contains other medicinal compounds including cannabinol, cannabigerol, cannabidiol, and cannabichromene.


There’s a growing consensus that cannabis is a highly effective treatment for many kinds of neuropathic pain. A 2015 study published in Neurotherapeutics states, “Clinical studies largely affirm that neuropathic pain patients derive benefits from cannabinoid treatment.”   But much of the human-based research (like this study) on CBD and nerve pain has centered around the efficacy of the FDA-approved medication Sativex, which includes both THC and CBD. Research on the best CBD for pain isolated from THC is still limited when it comes to neuropathic pain. There are exceptions, though:
Cannabis has always been a popular form of treatment for a variety of medical conditions, but in the 1930’s growing concerns about the dangers of marijuana abuse led to cannabinoids being banned. A century has past and despite all efforts from cannabis enthusiasts through social media channels and online media, cannabis is still classed as a schedule 1 drug.
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