Pharmacology published a study in 2016 looking at medical marijuana for migraines, specifically in relation to its effects on serotonin, with very positive results. You’ll notice that neither study looked at CBD in isolation from other cannabinoids (which is an issue with a lot of research on CBD and pain). Truthfully, the research on CBD alone just isn’t sufficient to make any pronouncements about its effects on headache pain.
You are likely very familiar with the dangers that prescription painkillers (and other pharmaceuticals) present. In fact, it’s estimated that the majority of CBD oil users attempt to switch to the all-natural therapy for the precise reason of kicking prescription med habits, which all too often cause an overwhelming array of irritability, sleep disruption, digestive complications, and even thoughts of suicide.
Honestly, I began to wonder if I was just experiencing the placebo effect. But on the one day, I didn’t take my CBD oil, I ended up picking a fight with my boyfriend (totally my fault) and let a few off-color remarks by a family member mess with my mood. Truly, I feel like it was a bit less anxious, both of those incidents could have been diverted.
A natural plant extract, CBD (or cannabidiol) has made a huge stir in the health scene over the last decade. It’s not hard to find plentiful anecdotal evidence of its benefits — people are using CBD for pain relief, mood regulation, cancer prevention, even seizure reduction. But if you’re in pain, you’re probably looking for more than anecdotal evidence. We get it — and we’re here to help.
It is thought that by applying the correct amount of cannabis, the cannabinoids can help with the promotion of lipids which help fight chronic skin conditions including acne and psoriasis. Some also claim that cannabis oil has the power to remove wrinkles and skin spots. While we wouldn’t bank on it being the “anti-aging” miracle, it is helping millions of people worldwide deal with a variety of skin diseases including eczema and rosacea.
Find the right CBD to THC ratio for you. Some people enjoy the high that THC provides, while others feel undesirably “out of it” when they use products with significant amounts of THC. No single ratio works for everyone, so experiment with a few different ones until you feel that the product you’re using is working well and helping you. You can also choose a ratio based on what you’re hoping to achieve with the use of CBD oil.[7]
Luckily, it’s possible to procure CBD oil that has no THC in it. Products made from CBD Isolate or Broad Spectrum CBD can be good options if you want to avoid THC. In fact, some of the best CBD products for pain include topical salves that can be made from isolate CBD oil. Just be sure to check out third-party lab reports to ensure you’re getting exactly what you pay for. And keep your eyes peeled for future research on CBD for pain.
Please note that none of the presented products or services haven’t been evaluated by FDA as yet hence they are not intended to offer an alternative or substitute for a proper medical diagnose, a proper medical /surgical treatment or to prevent /cure certain illness conditions. For best results, you must contact your doctor after doing your own homework and why not, reading various feedbacks found easily all over the web. The info found on this page will not substitute a proper medical advice hence treat them as such, no matter you are considering a product that will help you lose weight, a success story or when quoting other publications or TV shows.
Ranging from irritating to debilitating, joint pain can be tricky to treat. If your pain is mild, ibuprofen or acetaminophen might be adequate. But the worse it gets, the more likely you are to be prescribed antidepressants, muscle relaxants, or even opioids. Because of the side effects associated with these prescription medications, there has been quite a bit of research on CBD and joint pain — with promising results. Here are a few studies that point to CBD’s potential:
And then I woke up on the concrete, a worried crowd gathered around me. “You had a seizure,” my friend said gently as I blinked my eyes, trying to process this new information. I remember it was warm that night because I was wearing a sundress, and when I finally regained consciousness my first worry was that my dress flew up and everyone could see my underwear.
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