However, if it was sourced from actual marijuana (i.e. cannabis that contains more than 2% THC by volume), then it is technically illegal. Most of the best CBD oils for pain that you find in dispensaries in states like Colorado, California, and Washington (as well as other states where weed is legal) will have been extracted from marijuana plants — not industrial hemp plants. Unfortunately, this means that these products are not allowed to be sold online and shipped across state lines to “non-legal” states.
Although several clinical studies focused on the health effects of CBD, the results available so far were not enough to convince the FDA to approve it as a drug. The FDA does not agree with its use as a dietary supplement either, but as long as sellers publish the appropriate disclaimers (like those on the CBDPure website and labels), it’s not up to them.
Moreover, a patient survey conducted by Project CBD, declared that “…cannabis appears to be an effective pain management tool with few negative side effects.” The study went on to say that a “…significant decrease in opiate usage among elderly patients while taking medical cannabis [was observed during trial].” In short, it has been portrayed clearly numerous times through valid and well-publicized clinical studies that cannabis is a practical option in terms of efficient pain management.
It makes no sense to me that something that helps with anxiety has an irritability side effect – as a lot of my anxiety is co-mingled naturally with irritability. Further, I have noticed none of these side effects, given that if you become fatigued or sleepy, you adjust dose the next day. So I don’t call that a side effect – rather – an effect of taking too much. 

Cannabis has always been a popular form of treatment for a variety of medical conditions, but in the 1930’s growing concerns about the dangers of marijuana abuse led to cannabinoids being banned. A century has past and despite all efforts from cannabis enthusiasts through social media channels and online media, cannabis is still classed as a schedule 1 drug.
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