And we have a long way to go before we fully understand the relationship between CBD and pain regulation. But strong anecdotal evidence, combined with multiple lab tests and even some clinical trials, have established that CBD holds a lot of promise for pain relief. Or in science-speak, CBD “represents a novel class of therapeutic agents for the treatment of chronic pain.”
This article provides a wealth of practical information for the individual considering CBD as an adjunctive or alternative treatment for pain and or anxiety. CBD works in the body by manipulating receptors throughout organ tissues, the immune system, the pain response system, the hormonal system, and other systemic regulatory systems. While CBD oils have not been reviewed or approved by the FDA for the treatment of these conditions, a wealth of literature, both anecdotal and research-related now exists to help describe both their safety and effectiveness. As discussed in this article, the potential new adopter must be mindful of several important items. First, only those products that are sourced from Industrial Hemp will be considered legal in all states. One must be careful if the product you choose is sourced from the marijuana plant, as those products may contain THC levels above the legal limit in your given state. Secondly, all products are NOT created equal – they differ significantly in strength, absorption, and elimination by the body and in the manner in which they are formulated. One should be mindful of the differences in doses available for each of these products, starting at a low or moderate dose and increasing as needed in order to find the lowest dose that provides the desired relief. In this way, one can individualize usage to maximize effectiveness, while minimizing risk, a proper goal for the use of all medicinals.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your healthcare provider or 911 immediately. Any mention of products or services is not meant as a guarantee, endorsement, or recommendation of the products, services, or companies. Reliance on any information provided is solely at your own risk. Please discuss any options with your healthcare provider.
The reason so many people are interested in cannabis products that don’t make them high, proponents say, is that CBD helps with everything from pain and nausea to rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, Crohn’s disease, and dementia. CBD is anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety, antibacterial, immunosuppressive, and more, says Joseph Cohen, DO, a cannabis doctor in Boulder, CO.

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Cunha et al. reported a 2-phase pilot study of CBD versus placebo in normal volunteers and patients with refractory secondarily generalized epilepsy (14). In the first phase, 8 normal volunteers received CBD or placebo in a doubled-blind fashion, at a dose of 3 mg/kg for 30 days. The second phase was also double-blinded in 15 patients with epilepsy receiving 200 to 300 mg daily of CBD or placebo for 135 days. Patients continued baseline AED. All subjects tolerated CBD well, with no serious adverse events. Four of the epilepsy patients receiving CBD were “almost free of convulsive crisis” for the duration of the study. Three other patients receiving CBD had a partial reduction in seizures, and 1 subject had no response. Of the 7 patients receiving placebo, seizure frequency was unchanged in 6, and 1 had clear improvement in seizure control.
Pharmacology published a study in 2016 looking at medical marijuana for migraines, specifically in relation to its effects on serotonin, with very positive results. You’ll notice that neither study looked at CBD in isolation from other cannabinoids (which is an issue with a lot of research on CBD and pain). Truthfully, the research on CBD alone just isn’t sufficient to make any pronouncements about its effects on headache pain.
Other potential side effects include low blood pressure, lightheadedness, and drowsiness, but these have typically only occurred in patients who have exceeded doses of 1,500 mg daily for a period of 4 weeks or more; far more than the average person will need take on a daily basis for chronic pain symptoms. (In fact, the majority of CBD users claim they find an effective dose to be anywhere between 10 and 40 mg daily).

Researchers at the Department of Pharmacognosy, The School of Pharmacy, University of London, UK, basis the study conducted on mice found that CBD oil has analgesic properties and may relieve chronic pain of all kinds . It can disrupt the activity of pain receptors in the body and instead cause a release of neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine – “feel good” compounds that can ease discomfort and pain, even if the pharmaceutical painkillers have no effect.
Although CBD oils aren’t regulated by the FDA, purchasing products stateside from one of the nine states where recreational and medical cannabis use is legal will likely result in a higher-quality product than buying one made with hemp-derived CBD oil imported from abroad, says Martin Lee, director of Project CBD, a nonprofit that promotes medical research into CBD.
CBD oil has numerous healing properties and has been connected to assisting with a diverse number of health problems. From migraines to anxiety and stress CBD oil is gaining popularity among medical patients. Only now is CBD oil coming into the light and thanks to this miraculous plant there are many ways you can use CBD oil, depending on what you want relief from!
I have read about studies from Europe (not very specific I know) that suggest CBD might work better for some people if combined with some level of THC. Also, the getting high part can be helpful, although not for everybody, of course. A second point – I don’t hear very much about CBD eliminating or almost eliminating pain for people with severe pain. Helpful, but, so far at least, it doesn’t seem that CBDs can replace opioids or substantially reduce pain for all chronic pain patients. Maybe someday.
Generalized pain, for instance, has dozens upon dozens of high profile research and clinical studies that have been carried out in universities and laboratories around the globe. One of the most well-publicized of these studies took place back in 2008, in which results determined that “cannabinoid analgesics (pain relievers) have generally been well tolerated in clinical trials … with acceptable adverse event profiles (meaning acceptable effectiveness for practical use).
To make matters more confusing, nine states (including California, Washington, and Colorado) let residents buy cannabis-based products with or without THC. Nearly two dozen other “medical marijuana states” allow the sale of cannabis, including capsules, tinctures, and other items containing CBD or THC, at licensed dispensaries to people whose doctors have certified that they have an approved condition (the list varies by state but includes chronic pain, PTSD, cancer, autism, Crohn’s disease, and multiple sclerosis). Sixteen more states legalized CBD for certain diseases.
Green Label hemp oil has the lowest CBD content of our RSHO™ because the cannabinoids in the oil have not been decarboxylated, making Green Label oil higher in CBDa than our other oils, containing a total of 50 mg of CBD per serving. Our popular Blue Label RSHO™ registers in the middle of our pure hemp oil potencies, containing 85 mg of CBD per serving. Finally, our filtered Gold Label RSHO™ tops out with 120 mg of CBD per serving, the highest of any of our products.
Use a water bong and a healthstone if you already have them. Place a healthstone, which is a carbon-stone patty, into your bowl and scoop some CBD oil onto the end of a dabber. Then, hold the end of the dabber just over the healthstone and light the dabber with a lighter. This will heat up the dabber so that the oil falls onto the healthstone and becomes vaporized. Light the bowl and use the water bong normally, by inhaling through the mouthpiece.[1]
John Staughton is a traveling writer, editor, and publisher who earned his English and Integrative Biology degrees from the University of Illinois in Champaign, Urbana (USA). He is the co-founder of a literary journal, Sheriff Nottingham, and calls the most beautiful places in the world his office. On a perpetual journey towards the idea of home, he uses words to educate, inspire, uplift and evolve.
CBDPure has both strengths and weaknesses. We’ve seen worse, and we’ve seen better supplements. To minimize investment risks, we advise that you test the customer service first, by sending them an email, and only place the order after you’ve made sure they are responsive. They have an online chat option. However, considering that the website and the terms and conditions ask that you send emails, it is safer to stick to their recommendations.
Thank you for your questions. Marijuana and hemp are two extremely different strains of the same cannabis sativa plant that have been bred over thousands of years to have entirely different purposes. (Hemp is not the male version of the marijuana plant.) They both contain CBD. Hemp only contains CBD whereas marijuana contains CBD and perhaps a hundred or so other chemicals with a variety of functions, such as THC, the molecule that makes people “high”. Any medicine can have different effects on different people. For example, Benadryl makes some people sleepy yet can make others wide-awake. So, it is not inconsistent for a particular medicine to cause a symptom in one person and to help alleviate it in another. So while many people experience relaxation with CBD, so people do experience the “paradoxical” effect of irritability.
The statements made regarding these products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The efficacy of these products has not been confirmed by FDA-approved research. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. All information presented here is not meant as a substitute for or alternative to information from health care practitioners. Please consult your health care professional about potential interactions or other possible complications before using any product.
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