But scientists have found that CBD doesn’t bind well with endocannabinoid receptors. Instead, CBD influences the system indirectly. This creates many benefits, which is why you’ll hear of CBD as a treatment for so many different medical conditions. And, unlike THC, it won’t make you high. When it comes to pain, we know that CBD has multiple functions. First, it influences neurotransmitters and receptors. One receptor known to be involved with pain and inflammation is called TRPV1 — also known as a vanilloid receptor. CBD binds to the TRPV1 receptor, influencing the way you perceive pain. CBD can also affect the production of neurotransmitters like serotonin and glutamate, which are related to pain sensation.
If this is not sufficient for calming your symptoms, a gradual increase of another 25 mg per day, over the course of 3-4 weeks, is recommended. While there have been no reports of more serious side effects when this oil is taken in larger concentrations, it is best to slowly increase your dose to find a comfortable and effective level, given your individual characteristics and needs.
However, switching to CBD oil from a conventional medication is far from a random stab in the dark. In fact, there was a large scale (and very well-documented) survey carried out less than two years ago that looked at precisely what percentage of patients were able to “swap” their side effect-inducing meds for a 100% natural, cannabis-based therapy.
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Having a medical condition is difficult enough, but if that condition doesn’t respond to medical treatment, life can become a constant battle. Refractory epilepsy is also known as uncontrolled or drug-resistant epilepsy. This means that a person who is suffering from refractory epilepsies is not responding to traditional medicine and thus is unable to effectively manage his or her neurological disorder.
Pharmacology published a study in 2016 looking at medical marijuana for migraines, specifically in relation to its effects on serotonin, with very positive results. You’ll notice that neither study looked at CBD in isolation from other cannabinoids (which is an issue with a lot of research on CBD and pain). Truthfully, the research on CBD alone just isn’t sufficient to make any pronouncements about its effects on headache pain.
I use this for my anxiety and for my arthritis. The topical works great for my chronic neck pain. The best way to go is to get your own raw, tested material and use it in whatever form you like. It’s quite easy to make your own extract. This has worked better for me, rather than relying on a purchased, untested product – where some seem to work and others are a waste. But even with those that work, of course the cost is ridiculous and not affordable, thanks to all these corporate-pleasing laws in place, not there for the people – don’t delude yourselves.
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